Workshop@DCE Part-II

After sailing through the fitting, foundary and welding in the first semester, the workshop continued to the second semester as well. This time we had sheet metal work and forging.

Sheet Metal Work
In this, we were provided with thin iron sheets and using them we had to make cuboidal and cylindrical boxes. Initially it didn't seem or sound as difficult as fitting or welding. There were wooden hammers, scales, and "properly working" machines to cut sheets to the accurate measurements. So thankfully we didn't have to rely on saws to cut the sheets. Once cut, the sheet had to be folded with its ends interlocked. The base had to be fitted separately to complete the box. Interlocking was the most difficult part. Moreover, the "world class hammers"  of our sheet metal workshop made the task even more difficult. I remember with every 3-4 strong blows, the head of the hammer would come off its handle and therefore half of the time would be spent in fixing the head and the handle!! Fixing the hammer again and again was indeed an onerous task!! People could be seen holding the handle with head over it in upright position and banging the handle on the table to fix the head. The interlocking thus formed, played its own games. The moment we would realize that the box was nearly complete and we could run out of that workshop, its interlocking would unlock, taking us too many steps back. To interlock the two ends of the sheet again, the base had to be separated, and ends had to be interlocked, and finally the base had to be fitted again. Most of the people repeated this exercise a number of times... 

Forging
In forging, we were provided with cylindrical iron pieces that had to be converted to wedge-shaped. The task had to be done in pairs of two. For my partner, being paired with a girl was a slight disadvantage(why?? you'll know soon.. :D). First, the iron piece had to be heated to bright red colour in a furnace. Then one person had to hold the iron piece using tongs and the second person had to hammer it. Again, it didn't sound that difficult. However, the "world class tongs" of our forging workshop made the task too difficult. The person holding the iron piece using tongs would get a jerk in hands at each blow of the hammer. Initially we were not aware of it and it was decided that I would hold the piece and my partner would hammer it. The moment he hammered, I felt a jerk due to which I dropped the tongs and the iron piece tossed over the head of one of my classmates!! Thankfully no one got hurt. After that we took turns in hammering and holding the tongs cautiously. Despite all the jerks, I managed to hold the tongs and it gave a proud feeling too!! It's just that I couldn't sleep that night as my hands pained like hell...


P.S. I still don't get why Electronics and Communication engineers are made to go through the workshop tortures!!  

7 comments:

  1. Nice one Radhika! Brought back a flood of memories:)

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    1. Thanks a lot Mr. Rahul! If you could recollect old memories, the purpose of my post is served! :-)

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  2. wow !!Good one dear .. you flashed out my memories ...
    Thanks for sharing this one !

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    1. Thanks a lot Anu!! You too have done engineering??

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  3. I belong to DCE Mech.How many semester we have to work in workshop?

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  4. Very wonderful post, It’s pretty dissimilar from other posts. Machined components | Forging machine

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